Introducing Tuesday’s Vocabulary Tips

Posted by on Aug 12, 2014 in vocabulary, vocabulary development, vocabulary tips | 0 comments

Read, read, read. Read good books. You will strengthen your understanding of story. Your vocabulary will be the richer for it.

~ Carmen Agra Deedy

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When we are learning, it is so important to gain the vocabulary of the subject. Children need to be exposed to the new vocabulary in a much deeper way than the presentation of the word and its definition. In fact, if given just the word and the definition, no real learning can happen. Without forming connections to the new vocabulary, without making it a new and enchanting idea that captivates the students’ minds, the new words just remain words.

There are many ways to help students discover new words. The most effective is probably having the child in a situation where they discover a NEED for the words. Going back to infancy when their vocabulary was growing rapidly, a need for language is a powerful learning tool. Think of second language learners. Their language grows much more quickly when there is a need for it. Project based learning is a current strategy in education which can provide students with a need for new language. I plan to explore this in the future!

Every Tuesday, I am planning to explore ways and provide tips to improve vocabulary instruction and learning.

I am beginning this week with the Frayer Model. The Frayer Model is a graphic organizer having four squares with a circle in the middle for the new word. This strategy should not be used as an introduction to new words! It could be used whole class after an introductory lesson as a formative assessment of the students’ understandings. It could also be used as a review strategy to help students organize their thinking to prepare for a test. A page could be kept in an interactive notebook to add new understandings and thoughts to throughout instruction.

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The organizer above is the original version of the Model. There are many variations available. The purpose of this instructional strategyis to promote critical thinking and help students identify and understand unfamiliar vocabulary. It can be used with the entire class, small groups, or for individual work. The Frayer Model draws on a student’s prior knowledge to build connections among new concepts and creates a visual reference by which students learn to compare attributes and examples. Here is an example of a model that could be used with primary stdents.

Slide1Frayer Model Primary

Have a great day!

Ann
 

 

 

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