vocabulary tips

Halloween Context Clues

Posted by on Sep 21, 2016 in comprehension, vocabulary, vocabulary development, vocabulary tips | 0 comments

Students need to be able to determine the meaning of words that they encounter in text. Context provides many types of clues to the meaning of words. Sometimes, especially in textbooks or student news magazines a definition is stated or an explanation or restatement is added. Students need to learn to watch for this information and to use it. Often a synonym for the word may be used within the paragraph. By paying attention to this new information, students can gain understanding of a word. When a contrasting idea is given, an antonym might help the student determine word meaning. A prefix or suffix on a word can add to student understanding of its meaning. Often students can use their background knowledge mixed with the clues in the text to make an inference. The simplest help in learning the word might be found in an illustration.

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I’ve made a page for students to add to their interactive notebook to remind them to look for different types of context clues.

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context-clues-sample

I feel using context clues should be fun, so I have created a Halloween Context Clues Scavenger Hunt. Students can be out of their seats while determining the meaning of words. I have found that students love a chance to move. This product is available at my TPT store and includes the context clues material above (plus several other pages on context clues)  as well as 16 scavenger hunt cards asking students to determine the meaning of words.

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Monday Word of the Day “Adapt”: Third Grade Social Studies

Posted by on Jan 26, 2015 in vocabulary, vocabulary development, vocabulary tips, word of the day | 0 comments

Robert Marzano has created lists of 30 Core Content words that are needed by students for each subject at each grade level to be successful. To help my students understand these important words I have created small posters with the word, definition, a sentence, and an illustration. Sometimes the cards vary and contain synonyms, examples, or other helpful strategies to provide students access to the meaning.

The first word for third grade social studies is adapt. What an important concept! Being able to adapt is a major component of a successful life. With some discussion and examples, students are usually easily able to grasp this concept. It is helpful to students to point out throughout the year when adaptations have been made.

adapt

adapt

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Ann

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Introducing Tuesday’s Vocabulary Tips

Posted by on Aug 12, 2014 in vocabulary, vocabulary development, vocabulary tips | 0 comments

Read, read, read. Read good books. You will strengthen your understanding of story. Your vocabulary will be the richer for it.

~ Carmen Agra Deedy

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When we are learning, it is so important to gain the vocabulary of the subject. Children need to be exposed to the new vocabulary in a much deeper way than the presentation of the word and its definition. In fact, if given just the word and the definition, no real learning can happen. Without forming connections to the new vocabulary, without making it a new and enchanting idea that captivates the students’ minds, the new words just remain words.

There are many ways to help students discover new words. The most effective is probably having the child in a situation where they discover a NEED for the words. Going back to infancy when their vocabulary was growing rapidly, a need for language is a powerful learning tool. Think of second language learners. Their language grows much more quickly when there is a need for it. Project based learning is a current strategy in education which can provide students with a need for new language. I plan to explore this in the future!

Every Tuesday, I am planning to explore ways and provide tips to improve vocabulary instruction and learning.

I am beginning this week with the Frayer Model. The Frayer Model is a graphic organizer having four squares with a circle in the middle for the new word. This strategy should not be used as an introduction to new words! It could be used whole class after an introductory lesson as a formative assessment of the students’ understandings. It could also be used as a review strategy to help students organize their thinking to prepare for a test. A page could be kept in an interactive notebook to add new understandings and thoughts to throughout instruction.

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The organizer above is the original version of the Model. There are many variations available. The purpose of this instructional strategyis to promote critical thinking and help students identify and understand unfamiliar vocabulary. It can be used with the entire class, small groups, or for individual work. The Frayer Model draws on a student’s prior knowledge to build connections among new concepts and creates a visual reference by which students learn to compare attributes and examples. Here is an example of a model that could be used with primary stdents.

Slide1Frayer Model Primary

Have a great day!

Ann
 

 

 

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